A few days after taking the job, Matt Hancock was fired from his position as UN ambassador

A few days after taking the job, Matt Hancock was fired from his position as UN ambassador

Matt Hancock, the former health secretary of the United Kingdom, was fired from his position at the United Nations days after being appointed.
Hancock had been appointed by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa as a special envoy on financial innovation and climate change.
With the UN now telling Pass Blue that Hancock's appointment is not being "taken further," a campaigning group called Global Justice Now says that "the last thing the African continent needs is a failing British politician.".
Announcing his appointment, Hancock stated on Twitter that he was "honoured" and pledged to assist Africa recover from the pandemic and advance sustainable development.
It's since been clarified in a UN statement that "Hancock's nomination by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa is not being pursued."
The UN should re-examine this selection, according to Global Justice Now's Nick Dearden. Matt Hancock should persuade the prime minister to support a patent waiver for Covid-19 vaccinations if he wants to help African countries recover from the pandemic. Tens of millions more people may have been protected if he'd done it when he was in administration.
"A failed British politician is the last thing Africa needs. The 19th century is long gone.
Peter Stefanovic, an attorney and filmmaker, tweeted, "That went great."
According to writer Sam Street, the UN "probably thought they were getting a right result" when they saw a former British health secretary wanting the position.
That was followed by an investigation into Matt Hancock's actual work in the position."
Hancock resigned earlier this year after pictures and a video surfaced showing him breaking lockdown rules with his government aide, Gina Coladangelo.
As a result of The Sun's revelations that Hancock had an extramarital affair in violation of his own Covid restrictions, Hancock issued an apology.
He told the prime minister in a letter that the government "owes it to those who have given so much in this pandemic to be honest when we have let them down." Hancock.
"The last thing I want is for my private life to divert attention from the single-minded effort that is taking us out of this crisis," he said.
"In my opinion, those in high public office and large positions of responsibility should act with the right values and ethics that come with that role," Tory MP Duncan Baker told Eastern Daily Press at the time.
Former Boris Johnson aide Tim Montgomerie, a Conservative analyst, told the BBC's Today programme: "When you undercut your own standards, you must demonstrate to the public that you recognise the transgression you've committed and resign."

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