After reports surfaced of Westminster staff members using cocaine, Commons Speaker Lindsay Hoyle contacted police

After reports surfaced of Westminster staff members using cocaine, Commons Speaker Lindsay Hoyle contacted police

Sir Lindsay Hoyle, speaker of the House of Commons, has stated that he will contact the police in light of "very alarming" claims of drug usage at Westminster Palace.

"Full and effective enforcement of the law" and "severe punishments" for those who break the rules are the goals of the speaker, who issued a warning to anyone bringing illegal substances into Parliament.

In light of a Sunday Times article that discovered cocaine in 11 of 12 spots tested in the premises, Sir Lindsay has taken action.
It has been suggested by a prominent member of parliament that sniffer dogs be used to detect illegal drugs.

"The accounts of drug misuse in Parliament reported to the Sunday Times are profoundly alarming - and I will be discussing them as a priority with the Metropolitan Police next week," the speaker added.

Full and effective law enforcement is what I demand."

Sir Lindsay said, "While parliament provides extensive support services for any staff or members who may need help with drug misuse—and I would encourage anyone struggling with such issues to take up such help—for those who choose to flout the law and bring the institution into disrepute the sanctions are serious."

According to the Sunday Times, officials at the House of Commons received reports last month that cannabis could be smelt in an open area between two legislative buildings that house MPs' offices and committee rooms.

There was evidence of cocaine in restrooms near Boris Johnson and Priti Patel's offices, as well as other washrooms, according to a newspaper report on a single evening's cocaine wipe tests.

Some workers and MPs at Westminster were allegedly using drugs, according to a newspaper report.

"I've seen an MP openly snorting cocaine at a party," one person was reported as saying. Even when I told them about how dangerous their actions were, "they seemed to get a kick out of the power trip," I said.
MPs tend to be more careful than workers and would return to their office to do it rather than doing it in any of the public locations, although I have heard of one colleague who walked in on their MP doing a late-night line at their desk," added another.
Westminster veterans told the newspaper, "There is a cocaine culture in parliament. " In some cases, it's as if they don't care at all. It's not just me. Even if some of them are well-known politicians and others are aspirational newcomers, they are in danger of jeopardising their futures. In their bubble of buddies, they believe they are impervious to harm. Although it's a shock, it's also sad. Many of them are in need of assistance."
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The UKUK Politics Commons speaker has contacted the police on allegations of cocaine use in the Westminster area.

'I expect to see thorough and efficient enforcement of the law': a stern warning to parliament's drug-users.
The Political Editor Andrew Woodcock Posted at 18:54 on December 5th, 2021

The following video is a companion piece.

Sir Lindsay Hoyle, speaker of the House of Commons, has stated that he will contact the police in light of "very alarming" claims of drug usage at Westminster Palace.

"Full and effective enforcement of the law" and "severe punishments" for those who break the rules are the goals of the speaker, who issued a warning to anyone bringing illegal substances into Parliament.

In light of a Sunday Times article that discovered cocaine in 11 of 12 spots tested in the premises, Sir Lindsay has taken action.
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It has been suggested by a prominent member of parliament that sniffer dogs be used to detect illegal drugs.

"The accounts of drug abuse in Parliament revealed to the Sunday Times are profoundly alarming - and I will be discussing them as a priority with the Metropolitan Police next week," the speaker added.
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Full and effective adherence to the law is what I'm hoping for."

Sir Lindsay said, "While parliament provides extensive support services for any staff or members who may need help with drug misuse—and I would encourage anyone struggling with such issues to take up such help—for those who choose to flout the law and bring the institution into disrepute the sanctions are serious."

According to the Sunday Times, officials at the House of Commons received reports last month that cannabis could be smelt in an open area between two legislative buildings that house MPs' offices and committee rooms.

There was evidence of cocaine in restrooms near Boris Johnson and Priti Patel's offices, as well as other washrooms, according to a newspaper report on a single evening's cocaine wipe tests.

Some workers and MPs at Westminster were allegedly using drugs, according to a newspaper report.

"I've seen an MP openly snorting cocaine at a party," one person was reported as saying. "I cautioned them that what they were doing was incredibly hazardous and they may be exposed, but they appeared to get off on the power trip."

MPs tend to be more careful than workers and would return to their office to do it rather than doing it in any of the public locations, although I have heard of one colleague who walked in on their MP doing a late-night line at their desk," added another.
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Westminster veterans told the newspaper, "There is a cocaine culture in parliament. " In some cases, it's as if they don't care at all. It's not just me. Even if some of them are well-known politicians and others are aspirational newcomers, they are in danger of jeopardising their futures. In their bubble of buddies, they believe they are impervious to harm. Although it's a shock, it's also sad. Many of them are in need of assistance."
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This year's candidate to succeed John Bercow as speaker emphasised the issue of drug usage in Westminster, telling MPs, "It's not just drunkenness we've got to catch out; there is a drug problem."

Freedom of Information rules have now revealed that 17 drug crimes were committed in or around the legislative buildings in the past year, according to Metropolitan Police records. Between 2015 and 2018, police investigated 38 narcotics offences on the property.

Sniffer dogs could be sent in by the House of Commons Commission next week, according to the chair of the administration committee, Conservative Charles Walker.

According to him, the House of Commons has a long history of utilising sniffer dogs to find bombs. In the future, sniffer dogs that can detect drugs may need to be added to the list of sniffer dogs.

As Mayor Johnson cranks up his anti-drug efforts, he has warned middle-class cocaine users that they could lose their passports or driving licences if fines don't work.

A fresh crackdown on county lines drug activities is also likely to be announced in the coming week by the Prime Minister, who is expected to launch a new clampdown on these operations.

"Parliament is a microcosm of the country, so of course drugs will be a problem, but the working atmosphere of late hours and tight deadlines may create a pressure that feels unsustainable," said Jenny Symmons, the GMB union branch for parliamentary workers. Drug abusers need help, and we need to keep improving working conditions for our employees."

Communal leader Jacob Rees-Mogg said: "The Palace of Westminster should be the stronghold of lawfulness. Police on the parliamentary estate should use every tool at their disposal to prohibit drug sales and drug misuse within the palace," says a former member of Congress.

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