“Suicide Pod” Passes Swiss Legal Review, May Be Available Next Year if All Goes as Planned

“Suicide Pod” Passes Swiss Legal Review, May Be Available Next Year if All Goes as Planned

Switzerland has legalised the use of a "suicide capsule" that allows people to end their lives without suffering in a matter of minutes. To ensure a painless death, the Sarco is designed to gradually lower oxygen and boost nitrogen levels inside the chamber. It is scheduled to be operational by the end of next year.
In contrast to the present approach of eating sodium pentobarbital, the firm behind the Sarco thinks it to be a calm and painless option to assisted suicide. A biodegradable wood-based material pod, 3D printed and ready to be utilised as a coffin, can be removed after a person's death and used to bury them.
Detaching the patient from a clinical environment and allowing them to pass in their preferred surroundings is possible with the aid of the gadget.
Activated from the inside, it's a 3-D printed capsule that's activated by the individual who intends to die. The equipment can be towed to any location where a person's death is desired. For example, it may take place at the offices of an assisted-suicide organisation or in an exquisite outdoor environment," says Philip Nitschke, founder of Exit International, in an interview with Swiss Info.
In order to use the Sarco, the user is placed in a nice bed within the pod and the door is locked. In their own time, they'll be asked a series of questions before activating the suicide mechanism, which they can abort if they so choose. Afterwards, the pod will be filled with nitrogen and the oxygen content will drop from 21% to 0%, according to Swiss Info. Euphoria-like feelings are purportedly felt within 30 seconds of the brain becoming hypoxia and passing away painlessly. To put it another way, the process doesn't cause any choking or hyperventilating, and the death isn't nearly as severe as you'd imagine.
Sarco strives to deliver a joyful hypoxic death. Hypoxia, or low oxygen, refers to this situation. Depressurizing a plane is exactly the same thing. Being in a low-oxygen environment can be a pleasurable experience for some people. In a FAQ, Exit International says, "Just ask scuba divers!"

Inspired by Tony Nicklinson, a well-known British man with locked-in syndrome, the Sarco was designed to allow him to die in a way that he chose. It was in 2012 that his legal team reached out to the Sarco's designers to inquire for their contact information, only to discover that the man had died of pneumonia after refusing nourishment for a week.

The Sarco will be available for euthanasia patients in Switzerland by 2022, despite delays caused by COVID-19. Exit International also plans to add other features, such as a camera that will allow them to communicate with persons outside the pod.

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