Why Johnson’s speech to the country won’t help him

Why Johnson’s speech to the country won’t help him

There is a point where everything changes. Trust in Boris is going down. It could be very bad. Those words came from a senior Conservative, who has been a big fan of the prime minister in the past. It won't, says Boris Johnson, change the perception of Tory MPs that he hasn't done a good job recently. In fact, Johnson's choice to speak solemnly into a camera lens instead of holding a press conference and taking questions may have made that impression even stronger. After Boris Johnson said that he wants all adults to get a booster shot, there was no media backlash. That's because there was a plan to make it so that there was no media backlash. Covid-19's official threat level was raised from three to four because of how quickly Omicron is growing. There would have been a good case for questioning the usual trio of Johnson, Chris Whitty, and Patrick Vallance, to make the public more aware. Not right now. Because: Why not? There was an ex-minister who said, "He can't have a press conference." When someone asks him about Downing Street Christmas parties and gold wallpaper, he knows that they'll be about that. That's his own fault, not anyone else's. People think that Johnson isn't very strict with rules about Covid or ministerial behaviour, and that he's more likely to cover things up than to expose them, punish him, or apologise for them. This is bad for the government for a lot of MPs. Is it fair to say that even important things like building defences against Omicron are looked at by his colleagues and the public through a different lens? So if we lose faith in the PM's honesty, that could make us less trustful of policies to protect us from coronavirus, even if those policies seem to be backed by the country's top scientists and doctors. If people don't follow rules and guidelines, like not getting their boosters, not wearing their masks, and so on, then there would be a chain reaction that would hurt public health. Colleagues don't think he's a liar. "In just a few weeks, the party has gone from applauding him to putting up with him to wondering if he's up to the job." His life will be in danger if there is another mistake or scandal.

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